COVID-19 Trends Among U.S. School Kids

By RICHARD  September 29, 2020
 

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) updated its data on school children on September 28, 2020. It was already common knowledge that children under ten can transmit the virus. However, the latest COVID-19 trends among U.S. school kids tell us more about incidence, characteristics and health outcomes. Latest COVID-19 Trends Among U.S. School Kids Aged 5 to 17 Years During the period when schools were closed for summer, the infection rate for adolescents was double that of younger kids. Mortality and hospitalization of school kids was also low compared to adults. However, those that were seriously affected were more likely to be Hispanic or African American, perhaps with underlying medical conditions too. The updated COVID-19 trends among U.S. school kids also confirm acute COVID-19 symptoms are more likely among African American and Hispanic school kids. The CDC believes this suggests a greater need for face masking, hand sanitizing, and distancing at schools. This is because these are still the most effective way to reduce COVID-19 spread in schools and communities. Some Positive Outcomes from Sheltering and Home Schooling Widespread sheltering was in place from March to May 2020. However, when the rules relaxed COVID-19 incidence increased threefold among people aged less than 20 years. Centers for Disease Control is concerned this suggests young persons are playing a more significant role in community transmission. However, these latest COVID-19 trends among U.S. school kids have limitations. Firstly, they might understate the problem because testing was more frequent among symptomatic children. And secondly the data are from a single reporting system. Thirdly, the information is already out of date but it is still has value. That is because it established a base line against which to measure subsequent information. Moreover, it allows schools to adapt their COVID-19 mitigation efforts more accurately, in line with their local conditions